Meeting Aragorn//back in the village

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men, doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
(J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings)

he talks us
under the table during lunch break
i feel for trees beneath my naked feet,
& times i spent,
wrapped up in the Shire
of another time,
(hair colored blond and red,
wearing dad’s old army coat & fly-
ing was considerable option),
Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,

i pluck (in the village
where my mom grew up)
tractor fumes from boardwalks,
wind them into beads
with rows of buttercups,
what has grown
on us during a hay-less summer,
as we sit & read
cross-legged on the demarcation zone,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in halls of stone

on the edge of evening,
bring the old pipe to my lips,
wet tobacco bites
trails in crevices and creeks
while all the rest of me
tumbles skyhigh
on uneven deals,
(coat wrapped close around me)
stepping out into the width–
Nine for Mortal Men, doomed to die,

glow of bonfire, dew pearls (still)
on the soft curve of my hips
(no One prepared me for–)
“this
is about ownership” he says, i take the ring,
bind it round my neck, diffusing foam
on the horses’ nostrils, in the
fields, orks and riders gather
joining in battle song
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne, &
(all the way, i feel
his breath
———-upon me)

.

Sam has us write glosa at dVerse today..

The glosa is a form from the late 14th century and was popular in the Spanish court. The introduction, the cabeza, is a quatrain quoting a well-known poem or poet. The second part is the glosa proper, expanding on the theme of the cabeza, consisting of four ten-line stanzas, with the lines of the cabeza used to conclude each stanza. Lines six and nine must rhyme with the borrowed tenth.

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50 responses to “Meeting Aragorn//back in the village

  1. i pluck (in the village
    where my mom grew up)
    tractor fumes from boardwalks,
    wind them into beads
    with rows of buttercups,
    what has grown
    on us during a hay-less summer,
    as we sit & read
    cross-legged on the demarcation zone,

    This stanza is irresistibly poetic.

  2. nice….tolkien is one of my favorites….fantasy.adventure…all about it…you have used it well in telling your own story…that last stanza in particular….it gave me a shiver in getting to the end of it…the foreboding in th beginning of it with no one preparing you and the battle song then feeling the breath…my goodness…

  3. Love all of the images you combined together here to make one impressive glosa, Claudia. I can feel the glow of the bonfire as I read!

  4. How did I allow myself to miss out on reading your beautiful poetry? So glad to read this one. I love Tolkien, but even more I love the way you weave your images and thoughts throughout the canvas of his quote. I’ve missed your unique creativity. Gad to return. I’ll resume writing soon.

  5. As soon as I started reading I was propelled into my own memories … remembering my travelling family when I was little … we had beautiful gypsy vanners back then … these these horses are worth more than my “kind’ … jelem, jelem …

  6. One Ring to rule them all,
    One Ring to find them,
    One Ring to bring them all
    and in the darkness bind them.
    In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.

    Amazing what literary allusion (especially one so rich) add to writing. Wonderful piece. (Couldn’t resist finishing the poem)

  7. wonderful merging of time past and present towards your conclusion. I really enjoy your rhythm and the fine details. under the table, tractor fumes, tobacco bites, dew pearls. a super engaging poem.

  8. on the edge of evening,
    bring the old pipe to my lips,
    wet tobacco bites
    trails in crevices and creeks

    Reminds me of my grandad engrossed with his pipes. I love it. It tallied with the way he worked on his pipes,evenings. To me it became an art. May not tire one just observing and the aroma capped it all. Great take Claudia!

    Hank

  9. That is definitely a courageous cabeza to start with – Tolkien has so much, in both prose and poetry, to choose from. But to choose these lines, with their mythical specificity, that is brave. But you pull it off! Borrowing not just the lines now, but the style of the master, the verses array themselves like part of a tome from Middle Earth itself, a skillful imagination that makes the illusion complete.

  10. Wonder what he would have made of this.
    One summer I spent a few weeks painting in the studio where he wrote the last part of his work. [At the time he was a ghost, and his daughter lived there then,who was a friend] and we always wondered what he thought of our work, especially when I did some of the white horse escaping from black soldiers woodcut images :-)]. Have to say the place was lost on me, as I never read the rings or watched the movies. None of us were in awe: we just liked the light.

  11. You captivated me and took me back to a Devon beach, where a family holiday took place around me and without me, as I was engrossed in the whole Tolkien trilogy! I was very sunburnt! Thank you.

  12. This was an exciting & insightful read, propelling us from Middle Earth to small village; finding the parallels in poetry that draw fantasy, the past, and the beautiful soul that speaks through you into a fab weave of magical proportions; epic & imaginative; thanks.

  13. It’s not always easy to grow up, to own the responsibilities that come with age and knowledge. Thanks for this wonderful piece, beautifully written!

  14. Perhaps it is the past recollections in this, but The Lord of the Rings references have led to my mental duke box currently playing Led Zeppelin’s LOTR related songs to me : )

  15. I love this line: “i feel for trees beneath my naked feet”

    What a smart line break:
    “wearing dad’s old army coat & fly-
    ing was considerable option),”

    Mmm, love this:
    “wet tobacco bites
    trails in crevices and creeks
    while all the rest of me
    tumbles skyhigh
    on uneven deals”

    And this:
    “glow of bonfire, dew pearls (still)
    on the soft curve of my hips
    (no One prepared me for–)
    “this”

    Oh goodness. What a chilling, foreboding ending. I don’t think this is what you meant, but I end the poem feeling like an older man is reading the tale to you, a developing little girl. But by the ending, we’re being set up for the way he’s going to take advantage of your adventure-seeking spirit, crushing it with a physical invasion. I think I just made that up though. It was the way you described your curving hips, how no one prepared you for puberty, and how this man is breathing on you as he puts away the book, as if it is a bedtime story and now he’s lying down in your bed (or crawling in your tent, as it were). I don’t mean to be creepy—just sharing my thoughts and insights. Not at all implying this happened to you or that this is what you were trying to convey.

  16. … and round two (after tackling the form myself)
    i already said it is perfect; and after working with the form, i am even more impressed with what you did here.
    i just love how your words radiate – plus the lord of the rings bonus… aaah perfection!

  17. O WOW!!!!!
    I lived for these moments when fantasy mingled with reality and the old world boundaries came alive next to ours, and I felt the breath of my lover as I ride gallantly into my day! (Only advancing years put my comment into past tense)

  18. I understood this glosa more easily than I usually do your poetry (meaning I did not study it as I do with much of your work–which is good for me, no complaints!). It was perfect for the poetic form, but more so, it introduced me to you as a child and also put me in touch with my own inner child. It greets on that level of mystery and seems as close as memories. Loved it.

  19. Claudia, beautifully penned! Thank you for taking me along on this wonderful mystical journey-feeling for trees beneath bare feet and plucking tractor fumes and winding them into beads 🙂

    • I think that you have captured the use Of the glosa form in your poetic words.
      as your explanation Of… guided me to:(“all the way, i feel
      his breath
      ———-upon me”)

      Thanks, for sharing this form Of poetry with your readers… too !
      deedee 🙂

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