ART unLimited, and uneXpected

“well, this is funny” from his accent,
he’s american and talks to no one
in specific, just enjoys the statements,
which shout, “Hear me, hear Me–”

i am in a hurry, having only
a two hour ticket, running through Hall 1,
ART unlimited, to see as much as
possible, to find one gem that’s
gonna hit me & realize, i forgot
to breathe, to listen as i stop & watch

how the muscles in his arms move
as he spins the wheels, with
subtle elegance navigates through
chatting people, tiny doors,
sudden darkness and a light show
that pours one more message, i

stand motionless as people spill
into the crowded hall, his eyes,
focused on the moment, finely
chiseled face, pale with concentration,
gently framed by shoulder-long, dark curls,
& interwoven with first streaks of grey,
i wonder how he’s dealing with the spiral tunnel,
winding up to “after kerouac” –will make

him smile– with controlled moves, he lines up,
fragments of whispering art with tongues,
legs, hands and faces reflect hundred fold
in the shiny chrome parts of his wheelchair,

by the angle of
how his shoulders bend & mouth
into a straight line with the collar bones,
i trace their texture with my eyes, smoothly
visible under the fabric of his shirt, see

the perfect in the broken & think
art is found, often in the unexpected
and in listening to the things that talk
with a more silent voice

.

a little snapshot from my visit at the ART Basle exhibition last saturday and if i managed to create a sense of place/setting, i probably did a good job and Victoria who is tending the MeetingTheBar bar at dVerse from 3pm EST on today, may be happy with me…smiles… i’m on a business trip, posting from the hotel and will be in meetings all day– back home late in the evening, so my commenting will be a bit delayed…

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48 responses to “ART unLimited, and uneXpected

  1. Your poem was interesting, Claudia, as it seems you wrote about the people who were viewing the exhibit as if it was THEY who WERE the exhibit. And this can definitely BE. As you said, art is found often in the unexpected. One never knows when one will come upon ‘art.’ Exhibit or not!

  2. I’d say you did a good job. Nice capture indeed. There’s lot of things that make great art, little moments observed, seen, when one stops to breathe. So easy to forget to when one is in a rush to go somewhere though!

  3. Head and shoulders above much of the stuff under the poetry tag this morning.

    M
    __________
    Marie Marshall
    author/poet/editor
    Scotland

  4. Reminds me of the video: “Are you going to finish strong” … your poem is just as perfect as “he” is … so beautiful, C. Love, cat.

  5. smiles…you bring them…him in particular alive….i like what mary says as if they were the exhibit…but i dont think you treat them as sterile as that sounds….i love your description of the man in the wheel chair…and we often do rush and miss opportunities to see the beauty in life….and that is often found when we slow down…and listen and just be….

  6. “the perfect in the broken & think
    art is found, often in the unexpected” –

    so nicely said, with great visuals and connections in the scene

    you, claudia, are like our travel guide in the now 😉

  7. This is wonderful, Claudia–and you do give a sense of place – the self-importance of the art world, and then its quiet gifts – people perhaps best of all. Still must be quite a show. k.

  8. It seems you got a bit lost in the crowd and began to see them as individual pieces of art themselves. Wonderful! Yes, there is beauty and art everywhere if we did but open our eyes and our minds to it.
    Wonderful write. I wonder if the guy in the wheelchair will ever know he inspired someone to write about him. Wouldn’t that be awesome 🙂

  9. “ART unLimited, and uneXpected…
    i am in a hurry, having only
    a two hour ticket, running through Hall 1,
    ART unlimited, to see as much as
    possible, to find one gem that’s
    gonna hit me & realize, i forgot
    to breathe, to listen as i stop & watch…”

    Hi! Claudia…
    I must admit that you did a great job…creating a sense of place/setting in your use Of your poetic words. Your poem is very descriptive… too!
    Thanks, for sharing!
    deedee 🙂

  10. I was there. I saw you observing every detail, not just the “official” art, but all the art that existed around you. At least, I feel like I was there after reading this.
    How you can write such beauty and still maintain a demanding profession is beyond my comprehension. But you do it artfully.

  11. love this poem!
    there are artists i can’t get enough of and others that unsettle me greatly, like those who seem to see only ‘broken’… though i think not averting the eyes is a step, how many of us really SEE the person behind the wheelchair, behind the time-worn face… but seeing the whole, ‘the perfect in the broken’ – that to me is an art almost beyond art, definitely worth pursuing

  12. Claudia, I’m ALWAYS happy with you, and absolutely love this person/place you have shared with us. I wish I could drop by and visit the exhibit with you but your virtual, poetic tour is a delight.

  13. This was great, and I loved your observation on the American. I felt like I was witnessing it with you- loved your insight at the end. I say God has made everything beautiful, it’s just up to us to see it. Great job, Claudia.

  14. I like this, summed up in your lines in the last stanza:
    “art is found, often in the unexpected
    and in listening to the things that talk
    with a more silent voice”
    I totally concur.

  15. Limited time in a vast place! So then the art your narrator stops for is startling: accent, muscles, chair, motion, and face so that after the lights fade you keep him in the frame. It is the darkness that allows the narrators eyes to continue with texture and line so that who cares about the duration of the show and the pressure of time? Nice!

  16. Claudia- You have put me there! I love this, especially:

    he lines up,
    fragments of whispering art with tongues,
    legs, hands and faces reflect hundred fold
    in the shiny chrome parts of his wheelchair

    … and the ending!

  17. Well now, what are we to think of that?
    Quite a description, Maybe just as well that he couldn’t run after you.
    We’re not just talking ART here, are we 🙂

  18. Claudia, this is so rich with personal detail….I can feel the bones, skin under his shirt!

    That last stanza…..is so deep, it’s haunting. And true. A really fine and developed poem. And a great contribution to Victoria’s prompt.

    the perfect in the broken & think
    art is found, often in the unexpected
    and in listening to the things that talk
    with a more silent voice

    “with a more silent voice”…ah.

    Lady Nyo

  19. Wow this is eay beautiful. You have chiseled this person so finely, limned his lovely soul thru face and tongue, so by the time we get to this

    legs, hands and faces reflect hundred fold
    in the shiny chrome parts of his wheelchair,

    we already have found a respect for him. You’ve so artfully crafted this that the whole is so organic, less sentiment than oneness with the object of your contemplation, that I am left in poetic wonder. Simply lovely.

  20. it seems that he and the show are simultaneously places. moving, being moved, and moved through … “hundred fold in the shiny chrome parts of his wheelchair.”

  21. people-watching is a poet’s prerogative, moving through subway stations, super markets, bustling trollys, theaters, galleries, museums–all forms of art on exhibit, even the ones with flesh and blood.

  22. These are the details that make a poem, it is the poet who sees them, as the rest of the world rushes by. And your love of humanity shines through.

  23. A clever twist to relate on the onlookers who are being looked at. Sensitive to the surroundings can be most beneficial to poetry writing. Great write Claudia!

    Hank

  24. Claudia, this is great. The setting is alive here. The stand motionless stanza is exceptionally penned. Thanks

  25. The one comment I cannot get out of my mind is that I wish I’d written this. It’s wonderful and so real to me.
    The times I could have said (but didn’t!) running through Hall 1,
    … to see as much as
    possible, to find one gem that’s
    gonna hit me…
    Thanks for making my day.

  26. Your focus on the viewer of the exhibition gave us an oblique view of the place which was all the more powerful for being (as you say) unexpected.

  27. Sense of place, person and art, all in one. Great ending, and a feeling of rush and clamor stilled with insight. I especially like the vivid portrait of the man in the wheelchair that emerges seemingly out of the shadow–very visual and immediate, like a picture that begins blurred coming into sharp focus.

  28. Geez, this got me all choked up with emotion, Claudia. I was so startled by the wheelchair..so unexpected. There is so much insight and dignity in this poem. I love it.