mortality//from outside in

photo-154

from my sketchbook

.

i stand outside the little chapel
cause it’s crowded,
cause if someone dies too young
it wrecks you,
& you wanna say good bye,
at least,

through the pane
silhouettes of musicians,
(he was a member in the local music club,
playing the drums),

the guitarist from inside (squished
against the window) smiles,
due to the reflection, i recognize him only
on second sight,
we used to play together in the church band,
he is excellent & i look forward to
what they’re gonna play,

the last pale sunrays
warm my cheeks, mortality,
(a thin line between this and that),

my mind wanders with the light,
across flowers, people’s faces and
moss-covered gravestones

when it is my turn,
i hug my colleague long & tight,

“when you need someone to talk to,
call me, any time”

“so glad you’re here”

then pull my car out of the parking lot,
and filter in the slowly flowing traffic

.

linking up with poetry jam

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31 responses to “mortality//from outside in

  1. makes me think back to last year when i lost that student in a car wreck…the one i ate lunch with every day…the chapel, all the other kids, the crowd…all the emotion…i know the moment and its a tough one…interesting connection as well with the musician and you r own memories…how fast life passes eh?

  2. ‘a thin line between this and that’ – seems to me the key phrase …to understand how you stretching yourself/progression – from ‘ I stand outside’ thru recognizing familiar faces ‘we play together’ to ‘ “when you need someone to talk to,
    call me, any time” ~ what make me feel the connection you feel between people, ‘oneness’…’mortality// from outside in’

  3. Mortality is something we can not escape. The picture of you waiting because its crowded and the entire experience is heart-touching. Everybody needs some one to listen to them… and the hand you offered for being that listener is a beautiful thing to do.

  4. Seeing that a person has died, a ‘young’ person especially, always gives us a glimpse of our own mortality. And, I think, we cry not only for the loss of the person but also for the fact that we are once again facing our own death. For now we ourselves are ‘outside’ of that place where we will eventually travel; but eventually each of us will be the one ‘inside’ and I wonder if we will know then that WE are now behind that glass…where there is a thin line between this and that.

    I enjoyed seeing you over at Poetry Jam, Claudia!

  5. Oh, it’s tough when someone dies young … especially someone you know personally … there is peacefulness in your poem and support for your colleague … nice you were there for her. Lovely imagery of you outside looking in … also metaphorically.. and your painting goes well with the poem.

  6. Very powerful scene, Claudia! Death always stirs thoughts and feelings we’d rather not face too often. Indeed it makes us think of ‘mortality’, that of the people close to us as well as our own, of course.

  7. There is so much feeling in this and such a good response to the prompt. I can feel you filtering back into traffic after a solemn experience. Thanks for your comments and postings.

  8. Your poetry always put me right there with you because of the important details and the flowing way you share them. I can imagine the smiles exchanged between you and the guitar player through the window, giving proof life goes on and we reach out to those still here. And the traffic, what a juxtaposition indeed. Very heart felt, and interesting, as always.

    Hope you and yours are all well and ready for Kris Kringle! :)

    xoxo

  9. Lovely,.., mortality, in deed a thin line; losing someone young is always sad… they didn’t get enough time to see the world, to meet new people, to graduate from college…to finish that bucket list.
    I’m sorry fir your loss, but that’s just how life goes…we all go into that road, we all share the same fate, it is just the timing what differentiates us.
    Hang in there,…
    P.S. great illustrations here

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